The Grail Code 
The real Cup of the Last Supper

Mike and I did our first radio call-in show for The Grail Code on Monday. It was on Relevant Radio, which obviously has a large and loyal base of listeners standing by with intelligent questions to ask.

When you’re on a live call-in show, you know that the people who call are making that effort only because they’re really passionate about something. One thing I found especially interesting was how many people asked questions about the real Cup of the Last Supper—the cup Jesus himself held in his hands. What would it have looked like? Does it still exist? Is it the one in Valencia? Would it have been made of wood, clay, glass, or gold?

These are fascinating questions, and we spent some time on them in The Grail Code. Our answer is usually that we can’t really know: there’s no way to be absolutely sure what happened to that cup, and even the most likely claimants (like the one in Valencia) can’t be traced with any certainty all the way back to the Last Supper.

It really doesn’t matter from a theological point of view. Every cup that holds the Blood of Christ is the real Holy Grail, and you can find that Holy Grail wherever the Eucharist is celebrated. That’s probably why the New Testament never bothers to mention what happened to the cup: every congregation had the real Holy Grail on its humble altar.

But the fact that people (including me) are so fascinated with the subject shows us how powerful those stories of the Holy Grail really are. We’re champing at the bit even now, after all these centuries, impatient to be off on our quest.

Why do we care? Not because the cup, if we had it, would really have any more power than the Eucharist has in the most modest church. But just the feeling that it might, somewhere, actually exist makes us feel closer to Christ and the Apostles. For just the same reason, people hang pictures of Jesus in their houses—not because Jesus isn’t present if we don’t have a picture of him (usually looking like a sentimental late-Victorian English artist), but because the picture makes us feel the presence more.

I think that’s the real appeal of the Holy Grail romances. By telling the story of the quest for an object we already want to find, the romances draw us in from the beginning. Then they lead us to feel the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Eventually, we don’t need the object at all: Christ himself enters our hearts and makes his home there. When that happens, we’ve really achieved the quest.

5 Responses to “The real Cup of the Last Supper”

  1. wayne davies Says:

    i believe i got an answer to my question is the cup metal or clay. 10yrs ago i prayed on a sat night god did you drink from clay as you own it all, and you would not need to use gold to prove to the world you are god, so my prayer was god give me an answer sunday morn .the following morn was sunday i went to a swap meet to find on a table a man selling to amphores wine pots dug from where jesus walked iskenduren turkey, there were wine stains on the clay vessels and i showed them to dr roy blizzard an expert in this, and he said about 3bc on the style, we are made from clay of the earth and living water &spirit, so how else could it be anything else we need to look for the vessel of clay as literaly the rocks will soon cry out yehshuh(jesus) the messiah,amen!

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  3. Shorty Says:

    AKAIK you’ve got the anserw in one!

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